Supplemental Resources

Art is good for kids…..

1) Art Teaches Problem Solving. Making art demonstrates that there can be multiple solutions to the same problem. Art expands our experience and encourages open-ended thinking that creates an environment of questions rather than answers.

2) Art Prepares Kids for the Future. Creative, open-minded people are highly desired in all career paths. Art and creative education increases the future quality of the local and global community. Being creative is a lifelong skill that can be used in everyday situations.

3) Art Generates a Love of Learning and Openness to New Ideas. Art develops a willingness to explore what has not existed before. Art teaches risk-taking and being open to possibilities. Art allows one to grow from making mistakes. Kids whose creativity is nurtured are curious and inspired to learn more.

4) Art is Big Business. At the core of the multi-billion dollar film and video game industry are artists creating images and stories. Every commercial product is designed by artists from chairs to cars, space stations to iPods. A Van Gogh painting sold for $83 million.

5) Art Develops the Whole Brain. Art strengthens focus and increases attention, develops hand-eye co-ordination, requires practice and strategic thinking, and involves interacting with the material world through different tools and art mediums.

6) Art Improves Performance. Art builds self-esteem, increases motivation and student attendance, improves grades and communications, nurtures teamwork, and strengthens our relationship to the environment.

7) Art Facilitates Emotional Intelligence. Art supports the expression of complex feelings that help kids feel better about themselves and helps them understand others by “seeing” what they have expressed and created. Art supports personal meaning in life, discovering joy in one’s own self, often being surprised, and then eliciting it in others.

8 ) Art Builds Community. Art reaches across racial stereotypes, religious barriers, and socio-economic levels and prejudices. Seeing other cultures creative expression allows everyone to be more connected and less isolated. Art creates a sense of belonging: We can see how we are all related.

9) Art Awakens the Senses. Art opens the heart and mind to possibilities and fuels the imagination. Art is a process of learning to create ourselves and experience the world in new ways. Arts support the bigger picture view of life: beauty, symbols, spirituality, storytelling, and helps us step out of time allowing one to be present in the moment. Art keeps the magic alive.

10) Art is Eternal. Creativity and self-expression has always been essential to our humanity. Our earliest creative expressions were recorded in petroglyphs, cave paintings, and ancient sculptures. One of the first things kids do is play, draw, and use their imaginations.

-Mark Wagner

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Artistic Media Information

Collagraphy is a printmaking process in which materials are applied to a rigid substrate (such as cardboard or wood). The word is derived from the Greek word koll or kollo, meaning glue and graph, meaning the activity of drawing.

The plate can be intaglio inked, inked with a roller or paintbrush, or some combination thereof. Ink or pigment is applied to the resulting collage, and the board is used to print onto paper or another material using either a printing press or various hand tools. The resulting print is termed a collagraph. Substances such as carborundum, acrylic texture mediums, sandpapers, string, cut card, leaves and grasses can all be used in creating the collagraph plate. In some instances, leaves can be used as a source of pigment by rubbing them onto the surface of the plate.

Different tonal effects and vibrant colours can be achieved with the technique due to the depth of relief and differential inking that results from the collagraph plate’s highly textured surface. Collagraphy is a very open printmaking method. Ink may be applied to the upper surfaces of the plate with a brayer for a relief print, or ink may be applied to the entire board and then removed from the upper surfaces but remaining in the spaces between objects, resulting in an intaglio print. A combination of both intaglio and relief methods may also be employed. A printing press may or may not be used.

Great Links to other art organizations

Ontario Art Gallery: www.AGO.net

McMichael Art Collection: www.mcmichael.com

Ontario College of Art and Design: www.OCAD.ca

Know your Canadian Artists

Who were the Group of Seven?

The Group of Seven were a group of Canadian landscape painters in the 1920s, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley. Tom Thomson (who died in 1917) and Emily Carr were also closely associated with the Group of Seven, though neither were ever official members. In 1926, after Franz Johnston’s resignation, A.J. Casson was appointed a member. The Group of Seven is most famous for its paintings of the Canadian landscape and for their early, daring adoption – and skillful use – of impressionist technique and style.